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Can Someone To Capture A Few Codes For Me Please...
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Can Someone To Capture A Few Codes For Me Please...

by Tanner8 on Tue Dec 18, 2007 7:36 pm

Hey, I called Mitsubishi and they got their electronic engineer and all he could say is that it is in binary. He said he dosn't have them and can't get them. Can anyone help me in building a device to do so?

Also, to add codes do I need the TV-B-Gone microcontroller? I am about to order one but im not sure if that is the correct thing I need. I am using v1.1.

Here are the codes I would like...

Projector: Mitsubishi XD206U
banned Player: JVC HRX-VC16
Stereo: Sony Str-de197

Thanks :P
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by maltman23 on Wed Dec 19, 2007 2:49 am

Getting the POWER codes pretty much requires getting a hold of a remote control for the device in question and recording the code on a digital storage scope or logic analyzer. The codes are a series of "on-times" and "off-time" pairs. "On-time" is the amount of time for which the "carrier" is being transmitted (and the "carrier" means pulsing the IR emitter at a certain frequency, usually around 40KHz, but varies for different makes and models of remote controls). "Off-time" is the amount of time that the IR emitter is off after the "on-time."

Once you have the codes you want, you need to add them to the firmware source code using a text editor.

Then you use the open source software for your platform to compile and program the microcontoller.

To program the microcontroller you'll need a progammer, such as the USBtinyISP, available here:
http://www.adafruit.com/index.php?main_ ... ucts_id=46

To program using the TV-B-Gone Kit, you'll need to unsolder R1, R2, R3, R4. Rather than do that, you can buy another TV-B-Gone Kit PCB, and use it as a programming board (you only need to stuff the 8-pin DIP and the 10-pin programming header, and connect the 3v battery supply).

Mitch.

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by vpapanik on Wed Dec 19, 2007 3:48 am

You can also check out this easy mod :

http://www.ladyada.net/forums/viewtopic.php?t=4647
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by Tanner8 on Wed Dec 19, 2007 9:17 am

maltman23 wrote:Getting the POWER codes pretty much requires getting a hold of a remote control for the device in question and recording the code on a digital storage scope or logic analyzer. The codes are a series of "on-times" and "off-time" pairs. "On-time" is the amount of time for which the "carrier" is being transmitted (and the "carrier" means pulsing the IR emitter at a certain frequency, usually around 40KHz, but varies for different makes and models of remote controls). "Off-time" is the amount of time that the IR emitter is off after the "on-time."

Once you have the codes you want, you need to add them to the firmware source code using a text editor.

Then you use the open source software for your platform to compile and program the microcontoller.

To program the microcontroller you'll need a progammer, such as the USBtinyISP, available here:
http://www.adafruit.com/index.php?main_ ... ucts_id=46

To program using the TV-B-Gone Kit, you'll need to unsolder R1, R2, R3, R4. Rather than do that, you can buy another TV-B-Gone Kit PCB, and use it as a programming board (you only need to stuff the 8-pin DIP and the 10-pin programming header, and connect the 3v battery supply).

Mitch.


Ahh that is gonna be another project :)

Ok so I am ordering the USBtinyISP (You were saying tinyUSBISP over the phone which is why it wasn't comming up on google or the adafruit search :P) now.

The thing I don't understand is making a "programming board". Ya, if you do that stuff to the prgamming board how would that get onto the main board? What is on the main board the makes it to you have to desolder to get it?

If I get the PCB, that is all i'm going to get right? I need to buy the 10 pin connector for it right?

Im gonna order the usbtinyisp now...
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by caladan on Wed Dec 19, 2007 11:58 am

The programming-board mentioned is standard board without base resistors soldered in. Because their resistance is so small, uC cant be programmed when they are there.

To program AVR devices I use signals direct from LPT port, but it's little dangerous for your PC :D
USB programmer is good, because soon no PCs will have that port...
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by maltman23 on Sat Dec 22, 2007 6:08 am

Tanner8 wrote:The thing I don't understand is making a "programming board". Ya, if you do that stuff to the prgamming board how would that get onto the main board? What is on the main board the makes it to you have to desolder to get it?

If I get the PCB, that is all i'm going to get right? I need to buy the 10 pin connector for it right?


The programming board is just the PCB, an 8-pin DIP socket, a 10-pin programming header, and a 3v battery (two AA, or one CR2032, or whatever you like).

To program a chip, you insert it into the 8-pin DIP on the programming board, run avrdude (through WinAVR on Windows), then take the chip out of the programming board and insert it into your TV-B-Gone Kit.

I find this easier than having to unsolder resistors. But someone else made a cool hack that allows them to just plug the resistors in and out for ease of programming.

Mitch.

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by Tanner8 on Sat Dec 22, 2007 3:07 pm

Ok gotcha!

I just recieved the LED toady (thanks) and the USBTinyISP. I gotta build it when I find some time. I ordered the PCB too so I just need the 8pin DIP socket, the programming header, and the battery pack. I hope radioshack will carry that stuff, that is the only place I can think of to buy it from. Either that or online.
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by maltman23 on Sun Dec 23, 2007 6:06 am

I don't think that Radio Shack will have the 10-pin header. Jameco or Mouser or Digikey are good places for ordering online. And they ship quickly.

Mitch.

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by oPossum on Sun Dec 23, 2007 6:14 am

A resonator is also required to program a chip that has the fuses set to use an external clock. Anything from 4 to 10 MHz is fine. A new chip will default to RC oscilator, but once the TV-B-Gone firmware is programmed it will be configured for external clock.

The USBtinyISP can supply power if JP3 is jumpered - so batteries not required. Make sure JP3 is open if you do use battery power.
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by magician13134 on Sun Dec 23, 2007 9:57 am

oPossum wrote:A resonator is also required to program a chip that has the fuses set to use an external clock. Anything from 4 to 10 MHz is fine. A new chip will default to RC oscilator, but once the TV-B-Gone firmware is programmed it will be configured for external clock.

The USBtinyISP can supply power if JP3 is jumpered - so batteries not required. Make sure JP3 is open if you do use battery power.


Can you never change it back to the internal oscillator once it's been programmed to use an external one?
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by Probedude on Sun Dec 23, 2007 5:28 pm

oPossum wrote:A resonator is also required to program a chip that has the fuses set to use an external clock. Anything from 4 to 10 MHz is fine. A new chip will default to RC oscilator, but once the TV-B-Gone firmware is programmed it will be configured for external clock.


Hmm, this must be why when I took my V1.0 chip out and stuck it in my STK500 programmer it couldn't be read.
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by maltman23 on Sun Dec 23, 2007 5:57 pm

magician13134 wrote:Can you never change it back to the internal oscillator once it's been programmed to use an external one?


Yes, you can change it back. You change this by changing the fuses.

The fuses determine how the chip powers up, and these can be changed as much as you like.

FYI, the Makefile that comes with the TV-B-Gone Kit firmware has a command for burning the fuses:
make burn-fuse
The values in the Makefile are for using an external 8MHz ceramic resonator.

Mitch.
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by Tanner8 on Sun Dec 23, 2007 6:01 pm

For capturing codes do you think this will work???

http://iguanaworks.net/product2.banned
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by maltman23 on Sun Dec 23, 2007 6:18 pm

Tanner8 wrote:For capturing codes do you think this will work???
http://iguanaworks.net/product2.banned


This uses an IR receiver module (Vishay TSOP2238), which only receives IR signals with a 38KHz carrier frequency. Most IR codes have carrier frequencies that are near this frequency, but there are many that are much lower and much higher. Using this module will limit you to capturing codes that use carriers near 38KHz. If that is fine, then this is a cheap way to go.

You'll still need a way to measure the lengths of time for which the carrier is present and for which it is not present.

Mitch.

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by nonstopred on Sun Dec 23, 2007 7:04 pm

http://www.picotech.com/picoscope-oscil ... tware.html
using that and this program would that be the way to go?



also would this be a better receiver since it captures more of a range of frequencies?
http://www.home-electro.com/tira2.php
Last edited by nonstopred on Sun Dec 23, 2007 7:16 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Please be positive and constructive with your questions and comments.