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Compatible replacement for AT90S1200?
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Please be positive and constructive with your questions and comments.

Compatible replacement for AT90S1200?

by NLRevZ on Fri Mar 21, 2008 4:46 pm

Hi, I have a question regarding a simple "Knight Rider" 8-LED chaser, which I will be making. I am aware that the AT90S1200 chips are old and not in production anymore, therefore i need a replacement that will work without any (or with your help, a little) modifications, as I know absolutely nothing about this yet.

I'm willing to learn, but this is my first little tryout, so any help will be appreciated! :D
Thanks in advance.
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by Hazard on Fri Mar 21, 2008 5:12 pm

Here
It says: "Not recommended for new design: replaced by ATtiny2313"
Don't know if you have to migrate the code, but it is worth a try ;)
Image
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by Hazard on Fri Mar 21, 2008 5:14 pm

Oh, here, everything you need to know about replacing it with attiny2313
Image
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by NLRevZ on Fri Mar 21, 2008 5:30 pm

OK, I see, but I know nothing about porting code.. The code is on that project's page, but could anyone take a peek at that and make it compatible for the ATtiny2313, so that I wouldn't have to change anything I don't know yet? :/
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by schill on Fri Mar 21, 2008 5:51 pm

OK, here's my attempt to avoid answering your question and responding with some questions of my own:

Is this a one-shot deal or are you planning to continue playing with microcontrollers (I'm assuming you don't have much experience)?

If this is new to you, I'd recommend starting with something like an Arduino (or Arduino compatible) and programming in a higher level language than assembler.

You can get started for relatively little money and it will be much easier. An Arduino program to do what you want is pretty easy to write. It should be easier than converting - and the processor will have plenty of muscle and memory to do this (it's actually an incredible overkill). You could also build this with something like the miniPOV.

PS: I remember being in a Radio Shack (as a customer) about 20 years ago, when they still sold quite a few chips, and showing another customer how to build the same thing using discrete components. It doesn't take too many chips to do it that way, but it's very easy with a microcontroller thrown into the mix.

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by NLRevZ on Fri Mar 21, 2008 6:42 pm

you're right about my experience level - i'm very good with electronics, but i can't even remember how to do web stuff like PHP, let alone programming C or anything like that...

But as I said, I'm willing to learn, as I want to gain experience in this, so I can develop my own little gadgets to play with..
I'm "only" 17, so I think I'm old enough to comprehend most things one can throw at me, given that I would start off with something easy, of which I thought this would be.. Should I try making the 6-led version first? that way I can build a working device first, and then maybe mess around with code or something?

Sorry for my utter ignorance, it's just that I don't want to go the Arduino way, mostly because of the fact that I want to learn making things myself entirely, in the end.. I think the Arduino would not help with that any more than some easy little project that i could do without buying kits/other devices... Am I right(-ish)? :? :roll:

Anyway, thanks, and if possible I would gladly hear more from you ^_^
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by schill on Fri Mar 21, 2008 8:11 pm

All right, but I'm going to turn around and recommend the Arduino (what? who said they didn't want to use Arduinos? I don't know what you are talking about...).

You don't need to splurge and buy a $30+ Arduino board. Actually, I'd really recommend the Boarduino and corresponding USB cable.

The important thing, to me, is that Arduino is based on the AVR chips (but newer versions than the 1200). I am a really, really big fan of AVRs. You can use exactly the same hardware with any programming language and/or environment available for the AVRs.

It's nice to have a range of options you can use with the same hardware. While I'm not incredibly fond of the Arduino language (not that there's anything really wrong with it), for quick prototyping it works very well. Something like the program you will need for the LEDs will not be very long. You can get it working pretty quickly. Then, later you can write the same thing in assembler.

There are definitely times when you need a simple program and you need it now (or in 5 minutes). Having something you can work with quickly is good.

The AVR in the Arduino can be programmed using the Arduino language and the bootloader, or you can directly program them using an ISP.

I think you will find that AVRs are very versatile with many environments out there. Don't rule one out because it's too easy :) .

Addressing one other point, there really isn't anything to the Arduino hardware other than a voltage regulator and a crystal (or resonator). It's not like someone is giving you all that much. And there is nothing that says you even need to buy something like a Boarduino. You can buy a chip and a few components and go to town with a solderless breadboard - I've been known to do that a few times. But, I like to take advantage of things like the Boarduino or barebones Arduino (www.moderndevice.com) when I'm prototyping - I find having a module that already has the crystal and a couple useful headers around is nice.

By the way, I like to use Bascom AVR when programming my chips. This is a hobby for me and I don't usually have the time or need to resort to assembly. These things are pretty efficient and you can do quite a bit with the available resources.

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by NLRevZ on Sat Mar 22, 2008 12:01 pm

I know this is a bit offtopic, but I promised my friend that I would ask this, and I don't want to open a seperate topic, so here it is:

In THIS picture, there's three connections with an outline, marked 7805. I guess this is a transistor, but my friend found this: http://www.conrad.nl/goto/?product=175030
Is this the part that should be on that board? when assembled it would look like THIS.

By the way, I am going to try finding a simple tutorial introducing me more gradually to the whole process, and as my USBTinyISP is already on its way here, I'm going to start looking right away!
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by Hazard on Sat Mar 22, 2008 12:25 pm

It is a linear voltage regulator. If that part you showed in the photo is a 7805, I think its mounted with the right orientation, but it only supplys around 100mA.
Image
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by adafruit on Sat Mar 22, 2008 7:22 pm

if you just want to have a few leds go back and forth, you might want to look at the minipov design, the test firmware pretty much just goes back and forth.
http://www.ladyada.net/make/minipov3
uses a attiny2313

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Please be positive and constructive with your questions and comments.