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Camera Shutter Control
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Camera Shutter Control

by phil007 on Tue Jan 22, 2008 2:36 pm

I found a link to a tutorial on how to control the camera shutter using the Arduino but the link no longer works. http://wordpress.bolanski.com/?p=9

Does any Arduino user know how can I activate the camera shutter? Should I use a NPN switching transistor or an optocoupler?

Thanks,
Phil

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by cell on Tue Jan 22, 2008 4:27 pm

when you say control the shutter, do you mean using a servo to press the button, or use a usb interface to remotely control the camera?

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by Entropy on Tue Jan 22, 2008 4:34 pm

Need more details, such as which model of camera. They all have different remote cable release mechanisms (or none at all, in which case you need to disassemble the camera and hack the shutter switch, or use a servo to press the button). Even within a given brand, remote trigger options may vary. For example, the Digital Rebels use a 2.5mm stereo connector, the higher end units such as the 5/20/30/40D and 1D use a different connector.

For Canon Rebel and all Pentax DSLRs, opto is probably safest, and I THINK it'll work. NPN will probably also work, or a MOSFET.

The way they work:
If one of the contacts on the connector is grounded, autofocus will be activated (the same as a half-press of the shutter)
If the other contact is grounded, it triggers the shutter. Depending on camera settings, the camera may not actually take a picture unless AF has detected an "in focus" condition.
The last contact on the 2.5mm connector is ground
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by phil007 on Tue Jan 22, 2008 4:59 pm

The camera is a Canon 30D and I have the connector going into the camera. The camera will be in full manual mode including manual focus.

At first I thought a micro relay would be easiest but then I read that it needs a booster circuit. If it needs a circuit it looks like this quad optocoupler might be a good option.

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by Entropy on Tue Jan 22, 2008 10:38 pm

Unfortunately I don't know anything about the 30D's pinout, other than that I'm fairly certain it is not the same pinout/connector as the Rebel series (which is simple and the same as for the Pentax K10D I own). There is the possibility that triggering it may be more difficult than just grounding a pin, but I'm not sure...

A single optocoupler should be sufficient if you're in full manual and just need to ground the pin to trigger the camera. It really depends on the camera though.
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by phil007 on Tue Jan 22, 2008 10:47 pm

Playing with the camera tonight I found out that shorting the red wire to the ground wire activates the shutter. I'll try the optocoupler late this week when I get one.

Thanks,
Phil

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by TomLackamp on Thu Feb 07, 2008 3:08 am

I've built a digicam timer/intervalometer/remote using an Arduino. As of now, I have remote interface details for Panasonic FZ and some Canon cameras.

If your Canon uses a standard 3.5 mm stereo plug to connect a wired remote, take a look.

I use an 8-pin DIP solid state MOS relay IC for focus and shutter control. It's a nifty little chip for this app.

http://www.mindspring.com/~tom2000/Proj ... emote.html

Have fun!

Tom
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