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bench top solder fume extractor
Moderators: adafruit_support_bill, adafruit

Please be positive and constructive with your questions and comments.

Re: bench top solder fume extractor

by adafruit_support_bill on Sat Feb 21, 2015 7:35 am

As Mike points out in his post, here the primary risk is from flux fumes. If you are using larger quantities of flux in your stained-glass work, you will likely generate proportionally more fumes and some form of extraction is probably a good idea.

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Re: bench top solder fume extractor

by Prostheta on Sat Feb 21, 2015 7:43 am

Agreed. My concern was with noneyo_getit_0011232's post in that the alloy components are being heated way beyond 450°C with my 80w iron. There doesn't appear to be much guidance out there in this kind of work other than "light recommendation" to use one, and certainly no reasoned methodology as to why. Of itself, this thread has more usable information "as to the why"!

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Re: bench top solder fume extractor

by adafruit_support_bill on Sat Feb 21, 2015 7:52 am

The vaporization temperature of lead is 1750C, so even at your higher tip temperatures you are not approaching that.

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Re: bench top solder fume extractor

by Prostheta on Sat Feb 21, 2015 9:04 am

Great to know Bill, thanks. I wasn't sure how a tin/lead alloy might be different as a combination to its constituents. I'll adopt the same tack I think, and buy an extractor as a useful addition for the longer term rather than as a priority for the short term.

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Re: bench top solder fume extractor

by franklin97355 on Sat Feb 21, 2015 5:43 pm

For stained glass I would think you would need a bigger fume extractor but the main function is to remove smoke and fumes out of your work area. A fan with a hood that is efficient to pull the fumes away and preferably outside is really all that is necessary.

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Re: bench top solder fume extractor

by Prostheta on Sun Feb 22, 2015 2:43 am

As suggested previously, a big computer case fan designed for large CFM would work nicely. That is, as long as flux fumes don't deposit on surfaces such as the blades (as per noneyo_getit's points). A large 180mm fan at the exhaust end with a reduction in pipe diameter near the extraction point to increase intake speed should be pretty powerful.

I wonder if an ionic smoke alarm would have appropriate sensitivity to flux fumes in a small space? An extractor with a low speed which ramps up to maximum on detecting fumes in the exhaust would be fun. A foot pedal to do the same might be simpler of course.

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Re: bench top solder fume extractor

by ebsthompson on Mon May 30, 2016 11:54 am

I was thinking of my cat, got her a year from a shelter where she got a minor lung/sinus infection. Also, Kitty lungs are very small and much more delicate than mine. I've been soldering for 50 years, sometimes with filtering, half of the time without. At my age it's probably a good idea to use filtering, I keep a mask handy but always forget to wear it. Maybe I'll modify a good mask for my cat to wear! Saw a great dyi using dryer exhaust flex tubing and a box fan sitting outside to vent (onlinejewelryacademy.com).

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