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Using Twinkly Wifi Smart Lights in a costume
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Using Twinkly Wifi Smart Lights in a costume

by Velox14724 on Fri Jul 23, 2021 10:31 pm

plug1.jpg
Picture of power plug
plug1.jpg (189.15 KiB) Viewed 102 times
Hi everyone.. I've used Adafruit for several costume projects using everything from Neopixels to elwire and eltape. I saw a cheap strand of the Twinkly 100 Strings Wifi Smart LED Christmas lights on sale on ebay and picked them up ( http://www.twinkly.com ). I'd love to use them in a costume for a simple addressable LED display under a white shirt. However, the lights are AC powered (like regular Christmas lights). So I was wondering if anyone has used them before in a costume and what sort of battery did they use. If not does anyone have any suggestions? Attached is a picture of the back of the power brick.
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Re: Using Twinkly Wifi Smart Lights in a costume

by adafruit_support_mike on Sun Aug 01, 2021 10:12 pm

The output voltage for that adapter is 24VDC. That's at the upper edge of the human-safe voltage range, and I'd be leery of using it in a wearable project.

The industry standard is no more than 36VDC for momentary contact, no more than 24VDC for continuous contact in dry conditions, and no more than 12VDC in normal atmospheric conditions.

The limits for AC are lower because the human body conducts AC better than DC. And as an aside, the saying is, "current is what kills you, voltage is what makes it hurt."

Costumes get damp, so I'd avoid anything over 12V for one. Even ignoring the risk of shock, wearable electronics are at higher risk for component and wiring failures than circuits with a nice, solid PCB. A 24V arc can burn you even if you never make electrical contact.

I'd reserve those lights for a prop instead of a wearable. You'd have a more solid base to prevent wiring problems, and it would be easier to enclose the points where electrical contact could happen. You could use 24V battery packs for a wireless screwdriver as your power source.

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