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Selecting IC sockets for the beginner
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Selecting IC sockets for the beginner

by Abbarach on Fri Sep 18, 2009 11:26 pm

First off, I'll start by saying that I'm very new to electronics, so I'm not sure exactly what questions I should be asking Google to find the answer to this. I'm trying here because it seems that there are a lot of knowledgeable, helpful folks- if this is inappropriate, please delete or move as necessary.

I'm working on a project (not an Adafruit kit, unfortunately) that uses an IC labeled PIC16F876A-1/SP. The board doesn't have a socket for this chip, but since I can ultimately see myself trying to reprogram the chip, I'd like to install a socket to make the chip serviceable (not to mention add a little heat insurance, since my soldering skills are still not great).

I searched for the part on Digikey (here), and for this particular part number the package is listed as 28-DIP 300 mil. Taking that, I then went through the IC Socket selection, choosing Through-Hole, Grid positions 28 (2x14) and type DIP .3" row spacing, and found these, which are the lowest cost of several options.

Will this socket match the chip in question? All the criteria seemed to line up assuming I transferred the right information to the right places. Are there any other considerations I should be aware of that might make some of the more expensive options better?
Abbarach
 
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Re: Selecting IC sockets for the beginner

by zener on Sat Sep 19, 2009 1:47 am

That is a good choice. When you get the IC, the legs will be bent out a bit from the body. You will need to bend them to a right angle. You can just press each side against a table surface to bend them all straight. Then they will line up with the socket.

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Re: Selecting IC sockets for the beginner

by westfw on Sat Sep 19, 2009 3:50 am

Yes, these should work fine. It turns out the cheaper "dual wipe" sockets are A LOT easier to use than the more expensive "machined pin" sockets. The latter are presumably more reliable in some environments, but you have to have your pins tightly aligned in two dimensions instead of only one, which can make them a pain to use.
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Re: Selecting IC sockets for the beginner

by Abbarach on Sat Sep 19, 2009 10:35 am

Thanks, both of you, for the information. I really appreciate it :D
Abbarach
 
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Re: Selecting IC sockets for the beginner

by zener on Sat Sep 19, 2009 3:37 pm

One thing I forgot to mention about bending the pins: The pins start out wide at the top and then get narrow at the ends. When you "straighten them" you want to bend the wide parts, not just the narrow parts. That will insure the correct spacing to go into the socket easily.

zener
 
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Please be positive and constructive with your questions and comments.