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Bluetooth Sleeping Mask Upgrade Success!
Moderators: adafruit_support_bill, adafruit

Please be positive and constructive with your questions and comments.

Re: Bluetooth Sleeping Mask Upgrade Success!

by adafruit_support_mike on Fri Mar 22, 2019 1:05 am

The first and easiest way to handle EM emissions is to use twisted-pair cables, with current going out through one wire and coming back through the other.

The current in each wire will generate a magnetic field, but since the wires carry the same current going in opposite directions, they'll create fields with opposing polarity. Since the wires form helices around the same central axis, the fields will overlap and cancel each other almost completely.

If that isn't enough, run the twisted pair through a conductive shield, and connect the shield to GND. Magnetic fields try to generate current in any conductor they pass through, and will create equal-but-opposite currents in conductors on opposite sides of the field. The electrons in a good conductor have enough freedom of movement to cancel those currents, a a magnetic field can only have an overall effect on the conductor as a whole.

Connecting the shield to GND holds the voltage along the shield constant, so the magnetic field can't even produce an overall effect. Instead, the field has to adjust itself so its natural 'has no effect' points are aligned to the shield. In effect, a grounded shield looks like a mirror to magnetic fields.

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Re: Bluetooth Sleeping Mask Upgrade Success!

by DJDevon3 on Mon Mar 25, 2019 3:44 am

Revamped my first mask. I love the 2500mAh battery but it was just way too big. Created a new enclosure and did some slimming work. It's now 5mm smaller in every direction. Added some braiding and heatshrink to clean up the messy speaker wire. Getting better with soldering. Still 40+ hours but now more comfortable. Started using these as my daily leisure headphones too. Hot swapping them every day or two. I love it.

Started trying to build a schematic that combines the Adafruit 259 charger with a bluetooth amplifier module. I have no idea what I'm doing. Thanks to Adafruit for making their designs open so I can learn from them. Started with the MCP7833 charger and tried to replicate it. The only bluetooth module I could find on EasyEDA was the BC127. Added 2 amps one for each channel. I looked at the PAM8403 but decided to go with 2 separate LM4871's instead because the pinouts on the datasheet were easier to understand.
Attachments
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Re: Bluetooth Sleeping Mask Upgrade Success!

by DJDevon3 on Tue Mar 26, 2019 8:06 pm

Since my 4 other masks last for so much longer I haven't used the ProCiv. It was just sitting there gathering dust. With my new experience I decided to tackle making a true upgraded ProCiv. First had to destitch the threads holding in the battery which creates a much larger space in the front to add a larger battery pack. The only components I used are from the ProCiv mask and Adafruit. This is my Adafruit only build.

Parts List:
$24 ProCiv Bluetooth Sleeping Mask from Amazon
$13 Adafruit 259 USB LiIon/LiPoly charger - v1.2 https://www.adafruit.com/product/259
$10 Adafruit TPA2012/TS2012 2.1W Class D Amplifier https://www.adafruit.com/product/1552
$13 Adafruit 2000mAh Li-ion battery https://www.adafruit.com/product/2011
$10 Adafruit 2x 4Ohm 3W speakers ($5 each) https://www.adafruit.com/product/3968
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
$70 Ultimate ProCiv Bluetooth Sleeping Mask

This isn't a small upgrade. This makes the ProCiv not just a louder bluetooth mask but a portable mini-boombox too. :P

We'll just repurpose the existing recharging cord that comes with the mask. The 3" USB recharging cord soldered onto the ProCiv module should be soldered into the DC IN pinholes of the 259 module. Ensure you get the positive and negative correct. ;) That's so you don't have to remove the unit itself in order to recharge it, the cable is a very convenient addition. I need to do that to the rest of my masks. The ProCiv module has 3 buttons that act as prev, pause/play, next or volume-, on/off, volume+ depending on how long you hold down the button. There are 7 solder pads on one side (R-,R+,L-,L+, 5VIN, NC, GND (VIN & GND for recharge cable). They are labled on the back of the board. There are 2 solder pads for the 180mAh battery on the other side. There are no printed labels for battery terminal polarity but if you look very closely next to the antenna there is a G BAT embossing which means the battery GND is the one closest to the antenna. Also has an SMD mic/speaker so this is bluetooth phone call enabled.

I attempted to add a switch but the ProCiv refused to start with the in-line switch either on the + or _ side. This is because the ProCiv already has a true on/off switch. It has no low power sleep mode. It just straight turns off period. Why? To save as much battery life on the teeny 180mAh batter as possible. Pretty obvious why they designed a lot of features to save on battery life instead of giving the unit a bigger battery or bigger on-board amplifier. They wanted to make this thing as tiny as possible but in doing so sacrificed volume level and battery life.

This is actually one of my favorite designs so far. The speakers are more capable than the amp driving it. That means this system will go to 100% volume without distortion.

Now for results:
At 5% volume it's already TWICE as loud as the ProCiv was.
At 50% volume I can listen to music about 5 feet away, good quality.
At 100% volume? It's basically a mini-boombox.

If you put an empty paper towel roll on top of one of the speakers, you'll hear it from 30 feet away. The 40mm diameter will fit perfectly inside a cardboard paper towel tube acting as a ported box. The result is impressive for something as simple as a paper towel holder. I have no intention of using it this way just thought I'd share that in case anyone wants to make one for that intent.

If used with the 2500mAh battery at 5% volume (which is plenty loud for headphones) this system would last for at least a day. At 100% volume as a boombox I have no idea, probably at least a couple hours. Haven't tested battery duration at different volumes for this system this one is still a prototype. Haven't slept on them yet, need to make foam surrounds first, they're too big to just throw in a mask and sleep on comfortably, needs foam surround.

The full range speakers bass response is really good. They have a real rubber diaphragm with a plastic center and looks to be some type of kevlar style cone material. Unusually high quality build materials for such a small speaker. It's a true full range mini speaker, the same as you would find in car audio but one you can fit in the palm of your hand. I'd estimate if you put these in well designed headphone cans it would provide true 25Hz bass like higher end Bose speakers. They'll do 30-35Hz bass no problem. Those speakers are awesome. What seems like a ridiculous bunch of components to throw together as an experiment turned out to be something I never expected. My only concern is forgetting to lower the volume between using them as a mini-boombox and sleeping mask or risk blowing out my eardrums, a legitimate concern.
Attachments
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ProCiv Mask Internals
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Initial layout, how to connect everything? Hmm
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IMG_1535.jpg
No need for a switch. The ProCiv has a true on/off button (center button).
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Re: Bluetooth Sleeping Mask Upgrade Success!

by adafruit_support_mike on Wed Mar 27, 2019 4:18 am

DJDevon3 wrote:Started trying to build a schematic that combines the Adafruit 259 charger with a bluetooth amplifier module. I have no idea what I'm doing. Thanks to Adafruit for making their designs open so I can learn from them.

Schematics are a form of functional artwork. They have a job to do.

The human mind evolved to solve visual problems, so there's a lot of overlap between 'looks good' and 'does its job well'.

It doesn't happen automatically though, since our ability to see a job well done is based on how well we understand the job and the various ways of doing it. That's a 'time, experience, and massive amounts of practice' thing, and our senses of 'what works' and 'what looks good' tend to grow toward each other. After a while, a vague feeling that something is ugly becomes an early warning sign for technical problems in a design. That's about the same time you start seeing things that look pretty as abstract graphic design, but are a screaming horror functionally.

It doesn't take long to get comfortable with the basics, and then we start to develop a style. We look at things other people have done that appeal to us, and think about ways to add that trick to our own set of design principles.

There are no rules, only principles that fall under the heading "think about *why* you want to do something else before actually doing it." Among those are, "try to keep parts aligned vertically with VCC at the top and GND at the bottom," "try to minimize the number of crossings and corners," and "try to keep about the same amount of empty space around each component group."

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Re: Bluetooth Sleeping Mask Upgrade Success!

by DJDevon3 on Sat Mar 30, 2019 7:02 am

Thank you for the advice Mike. It's tough sledding. Prototyping doesn't have to look pretty it just has to work. Pretty comes later. I'm sleeping well lately. :)

During the journey of reading datasheet after datasheet I figured out the reason why the ProCIV only comes with a 180mAh battery is because the on-board battery charger will only work with 200mAh or less batteries. When I saw that I was like ahhhh that's why. My designs using Adafruit modules are really powerful because they have separate modules dedicated for each task. I've built 4 sleeping masks so far and all of them have multiple modules soldered together. Every mask I've built works flawlessly and better than I'd hoped, all of it is thanks to the quality of Adafruit engineering and components.

You can find a lot of wireless audio modules but they're always missing one or more components. Some have audio but no charger, others have a charger but no amp, and sometimes they'll have all 3 but they have annoyances in the firmware, dropouts, Engrish voice prompts, or loud tones that wake you up from sleeping if the battery shuts off.

My version of a BC127 module combines the Adafruit 259 charger with LM317 amps. No idea if my board will work as intended. It'll probably fry with 6 mil traces but should be fun. Gotta start somewhere. I forgot to add traces for programming it. Will do that in a future version.
Attachments
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DJDEVON3_BC127_Bluetooth_Amp_Module.JPG
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Re: Bluetooth Sleeping Mask Upgrade Success!

by DJDevon3 on Sat Mar 30, 2019 7:55 am

I really liked the specsheet for the WT32I-A-AI61-APTX so my 2nd design uses that instead of the BC127. This is the one based on Adafruit designs combining the 259 charger with the TPA2102 amp that will blow your ears off. Squeezed it all down as much as I could. I added a SPI programming interface using 2.54 through holes. It can be programmed using Silicon Labs software iWrap or Melody. Only reason I wanted to go with it was because it has BlueCore/BlueGiga. Might be able to use BlueSuite with it not sure but Silicon Labs has their own stuff and have an API of sorts. Much more friendly to work with.

Notice the TPA2012 adjustable DIP switches yup I kept those too they're handy and work great. I've gotten so used to prototyping masks with them that I wanted to keep all the features I could. This one is squeezed down to about as small as I can currently design. I don't care about external buttons for prev/skip/play etc I control that stuff from my phone anyway so they're just extra items that would take up space. It has 4 LED's to signal different states of charge and power. It's 3 modules in 1 so there's a lot to be notified about.

I think this is the one I'm going to have some boards ordered for. The BC127 isn't as easily programmable, this one is, in theory. It still needs a lot of work but has the most potential. I mean I'm using a prototype of this configuration to listen to music as a mini-boombox and also turn it down to about 5% volume when I go to sleep. It's both a mask and a portable bluetooth boombox, it's that loud with the right speakers.
Attachments
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Re: Bluetooth Sleeping Mask Upgrade Success!

by adafruit_support_mike on Sun Mar 31, 2019 12:06 am

6mil traces are a little light for anything that will carry significant current, and will probably kick the board price up a it.

The default size for traces is usually 12mil, and in general, you want the widest traces space will allow. Even the copper foil on a PCB has sheet resistance of about 0.5mohm per square.

The 'per square' unit seems weird when you first run into it, but is a natural consequence of the way resistors work. If you put two 1-Ohm resistors in series, they act like a 2-Ohm resistor. If you pur two 2-Ohm resistors in parallel, they act like a 1-Ohm resistor. If you make a 2x2 grid of 1-Ohm resistors, it acts like another, larger 1-Ohm resistor. For sheet materials like the copper foil on a PCB, the easiest way to measure the resistance is to cut a square of the stuff and measure the reistance from one side of the square to the other. What you get is a scale-invariant value, since you can build any larger square from an NxN series-and-parallel grid of smaller squares.

So for 6mil traces, the reisistance of the copper is 1mohm per 12mil of trace length, or about 0.08 Ohms per inch. Making the traces wider makes the squares bigger, and reduces the end-to-end resistance of any trace.

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Re: Bluetooth Sleeping Mask Upgrade Success!

by DJDevon3 on Tue Apr 02, 2019 4:47 am

Thank you for the advice Mike. I actually wanted 12 but it just won't do it with the auto router. Not a fan of manually trying to hook up hundreds of rat lines. It's a nightmare of a spaghetti puzzle. It's literally kept me awake trying to figure out ways to trace them without running into issues. I'm simply not experienced enough and I'm not an engineer. EasyEDA makes it super simple but not idiot proof. :)

I completed the sleeping mask upgrade today. The 3W speakers are too loud for me to go past 50% while wearing. I don't think I used thick enough gauge wire because the battery and speakers are a bit warm. Used the dupont wires because solid core in such short lengths is a nightmare to work with. Could be that the ProCiv has such thick insulation with foam and fabric.

So I have 4 bluetooth sleeping masks to swap between. These are definitely the loudest and with superb audio quality. It's got some real bass and kick to it. You'd have to wear these things to believe how good it sounds. I love those little 3W 4Ohm speakers. The ProCiv insulation is thick enough so that you don't really feel them. Yes you can sleep on them because of how thick the ProCiv is. These speakers would not work with the lycra masks. It was an experiment and it was a success.

Look on the bright side, the speakers getting warm might be a good thing if you live up north during the winter. I'm sure it's just the gauge wire, I'll have to redo it with thicker wire but the final install test is a success. It doesn't have to be pretty when it's hidden inside something pretty.

Here's a video to an example of the difference between the original and my modified version using only Adafruit components.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rvi1N8DvsXU

Attaching schematic in case that's useful to anyone.
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Re: Bluetooth Sleeping Mask Upgrade Success!

by adafruit_support_mike on Wed Apr 03, 2019 12:21 am

It's normal for speakers to run a bit warm. Only about 5% of the power you send through them comes out as sound, and the rest turns into heat. As long as the temperature doesn't get uncomfortable for you, things should be fine.

It sounds like you're making great progress!

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Re: Bluetooth Sleeping Mask Upgrade Success!

by DJDevon3 on Wed Apr 03, 2019 2:41 am

After sleeping with them for the first night they're not as comfortable as hoped. The speaker sound quality is amazing, best sound quality out of anything I've made so far, but they are just too tall to comfortably lay on, even with the extra thick padding in the ProCiv mask. They're not totally uncomfortable but not anywhere near as comfortable as the lycra masks with slim speakers.

The 40mm 3W 4Ohm speakers would be phenomenal for headphone design but a sleeping mask sadly no. Tried it, just not comfortable enough. The 4 Ohm speakers also suck the life out of the battery faster than a low wattage speaker, well duh. I'm using it with a large 2000mAh battery. Was hoping the ProCiv would smooth some of the battery bulk with the foam padding, nope. Just like the lycra mask it feels like a block of wood on the forehead. :( Finding the right balance of volume, audio quality, battery size, battery life, and comfort isn't easy. This one was both a success and fail.

Thank you for all of your advice so far Mike, you've been awesome, insightful, very helpful. Even if I use solid core wire from now on I'll be twisting them. Ideally using shielded TP would be nice but Cat5 won't carry the load to the speakers for this particular mask. It might for other masks but not this one. Still learning as I go, thank you for your wisdom. There's a reason ethernet is twisted pair derp.

All of my masks have been outfitted with some type of on/off switch now to disable the TS2012 amp and bluetooth module. It saves battery life knowing there is no vampire drain trying to keep the bluetooth module alive. Also provides peace of mind disabling all loads while recharging. However, one of the beautiful things about the 259 charger is pass through charging. Even if you don't use pass through capability it's there if you need it. Pass through charging for a sleeping mask is rare, you must turn them off to charge them, thanks to the Adafruit 259, it's a feature. :) The 259 charger is a thing of beauty. I would have never been able to do half of what I've accomplished in such a short amount of time if it wasn't for Adafruit.

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Re: Bluetooth Sleeping Mask Upgrade Success!

by adafruit_support_mike on Wed Apr 03, 2019 11:45 pm

DJDevon3 wrote:Even if I use solid core wire from now on I'll be twisting them.

There are a lot of hand-twisted pairs out there. Besides being good at reducing EMF, twisted pairs are easier to handle. A lot of people will build a wiring harness by locating the pick-off points for each wire, then twisting wires together as they join the main bundle:

https://www.evilmadscientist.com/2010/t ... e-bundles/

Keep experimenting with the speakers. Now that you know how the mask is made and how the pieces interact, you can follow the fundamental principle of Making and build exactly what you want. Once you know it's possible, it's kind of addicitive. ;-)

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Re: Bluetooth Sleeping Mask Upgrade Success!

by DJDevon3 on Thu Apr 11, 2019 12:02 am

Yes I'll be doing the chubby checker from now on. :)

So I ordered some PCB's from PCBway. I made a thing! They're pretty but missing components. I realized I made a huge mistake shortly after I placed the order that they do not come assembled. I knew that price was too good to be true lol duh. Just goes to prove I have absolutely no idea what I'm doing yet. Naturally, I went too far too fast. As if I know how to solder SMD. I can barely solder header pins to breakout boards. Wish I made them longer at least I'd be able to use them as bookmarks.

This one only has SPI breakouts. My next design is slimmer and has breakouts for every pin but it doesn't matter. At that size I can't solder them. Didn't realize they would be that small. I mean it's different when you can zoom in on the schematic, it's not that easy in real life. Looked into JLPCB and they wanted over $300 for 5 assembled boards. I don't even know if my board will actually work. It would require a lot of confidence in my designs and I do not have that. It would be a horribly inefficient way to do trial and error design testing from a financial standpoint. Feel like I'm out of my league and reached too fast too far. Will probably just stick with what I'm doing using Adafruit components at least I know those work.

Even if I can't assemble it, I can still say I made a thing.
Attachments
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Re: Bluetooth Sleeping Mask Upgrade Success!

by adafruit_support_mike on Thu Apr 11, 2019 1:08 am

SMT parts aren't all that hard to solder, as long as you stick with the larger sizes.

0805 passives like resistors and LEDs use pads about 0.1" apart, which is comparable to through-hole components. SOIC chips have pins 0.050" apart.. half of a DIP's pin spacing.. but are still pretty easy.

The only big challenge I see in your layout is the center ground pad for the TPA2012 amplifier. That's under the chip, so you'll need to use reflow techniques to make that joint. You can do reflow on a hot plate if you watch the board carefully to see when the solder melts, and having a good thermometer helps.

You might check with any trade schools and community colleges in your area to see if they have students who'd be willing to do the assembly. You can also check to see if there's a hackerspace near you. The people there would probably be willing to help.

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Re: Bluetooth Sleeping Mask Upgrade Success!

by jps2000 on Thu Apr 11, 2019 4:38 am

I can report very good results with a chipquick solder paste melting at 138 deg.
I pre-tin the component and the PCB with a solder iron at 200 deg using this paste. Then I wash away flux and pearls with Propanol and a cotton bud from the IC and the PCB.
After placing the component as precisely as possible I heat the board from below with a hot air stream of 180 deg until it melts on the surface. Then you gently press on the ic with a wooden tooth pick ant that is it.
Blowing hot air from bottom - and hold on coughing and sneezing- is essential because otherwise the chips fly away. A nightmare is the BMP388 a LGA10 with 2x2mm.
Of course it needs some experience to have the right amount of solder on the pins and on the board but this low temperatures makes you save that the IC and the board withstand multiple trials.
So you place these critical components first and measure with a diode tester all pins for proper contact. Finally place other smd with normal solder one by one.
I pre- tin one pad of all components at once. Then I place the smd with a tweezers and solder this pre-tinned pad just by touching with the solder iron. Lastly I solder the second pad an re- solder the first.
No miracle, but I suggest some training sessions with surplus boards.

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Re: Bluetooth Sleeping Mask Upgrade Success!

by DJDevon3 on Fri Apr 12, 2019 9:28 am

Thank you for your advice! I intend on purchasing some SMT stuff. I have a hot air solder station, USB microscope, and accessories in my cart. Been using a weller iron for years now. Apparently it's time to step up my hardware game. I'll be learning about SMT techniques. Spent most of last night watching videos. EEVBlog had a couple of really nice ones. Thankfully, I did order a stencil with it. Most of the components are 0603's except the TPA as you said. That sucker is my only big worry in terms of soldering it's the only unconventional part that will definitely require flow.

Yep I'll be placing them individually with tweezers and running diode/continuity checks along the way. Though I don't think I actually have any diodes in the design only caps, led's, and resistors. Like I said I've never done anything like this before. Very little idea what I'm doing. :/

About to go on vacation so it will be weeks before I get back to start on it. It has a full BOM but until I know it actually works there's no point in recommending it to anyone. It's publicly available on EasyEDA if anyone wants to download the schematics, modules, gerber, and bom. You can export to Eagle if you want. I like EasyEDA it's simple and effective. I tried Eagle and it was horribly unintuitive I uninstalled it immediately. Most of the design was based on Adafruit schematics so it's open to the public.

https://easyeda.com/DJDevon3/bt-dreamca ... 2012d2rtjr

I also made a newer design that has full GPIO breakouts for easier debugging. It's in the form factor of being placed on top of a dual 18650 battery pack. It has 32 GPIO pins. It's basically a breakout board for the bluetooth module and and retains the charger and amplifier. The charger circuit built into the bluetooth module I N/C'd 2 or 3 of the pins and routed them to the Adafruit 259 circuit instead. Just taking the Adafruit modules I've become accustomed to working with and squishing everything into 1 board. That's the idea anyway. The GPIO is for hopefully customizing the firmware to be more of a sleeping mask friendly firmware with unobstrusive notifications. Tired of getting blasted with low battery warnings that jolt me out of sleep. Most sleeping mask firmware is completely unintuitive for the purpose of sleeping.

https://easyeda.com/DJDevon3/dreamcatcher-2-0

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Please be positive and constructive with your questions and comments.